Standing as Lovers and Visionaries

We try to rhyme rhythms
That open blind eyes,
But we stumble.
Because the rhythms come in a form we’re still learning how to play.

As the quiet stirs, chords weave and spin whispers of this new dance we can’t explain.

Until now.

I hear it’s the sound of sweet sweet.

A sweet-sweet,
I like to call…

The love-sick song…and path to freedom.

Advertisements

The Divine

Breathing in,
I fine tune my strings.
Just as the water touches my nose,
I purify all thoughts to “wash myself of myself.”

I cleanse my all to become one with this sweetness.

This divine grace,

That is my all,

Is now free,

To become one,

With everything.

Everything that is beautiful and lovely,

And Everything I consider to be Sacred…

My Sweet Heart

O’ Beauty touch me still.

Pressed up in innocence against me,

The touch of your softness and the mastery of your skills,

Sing sweet perfection.

It seduces me into a slumber

Where my body goes limb

And I can no longer find the words to speak.

I ache for the chance to

To meet you again,

Sweet soul.

I hold you,

My dearest

Heart,

In my hands,

And kiss you,

Waiting for your return.

Free Writing

Consciousness writing.

The main objective is to allow the writing to come spontaneously.

Keep your hand moving. So the heart and mind can move freely.

Practiced daily this can reconnect you with a deep part of yourself.

Where deep feelings surface, purging and cleansing you for the good!

This exercise cleanses, increases awareness, and just helps clear your head. ūüôā

What is Flower Essence Therapy and how can it help me?

The practice of using flower essences in a consistent, purposeful way to experience emotional harmony and spiritual well being. ¬†The essences can be used to support or change our emotional attitudes and ways of perceiving. ¬†They provide a language that helps us understand our inner world and the ways in which we respond to life and life’s situations. ¬†Flower essences enhance our spiritual understanding by opening the channels to a direct experience with our soul and spirit.

While many healing modalities focus on the physical aspects of healing, flower essence therapy addresses the emotional and spiritual levels.  Healing is a multilevel process that encompasses the whole person, which includes the physical body, the emotions, mental outlook, attitudes, and spiritual understanding.

Here is a list of qualities you might like to invoke and help bring out the positive in you:

Clarity

Focus

Healing

Wisdom

Tenderness

Balance

Sacredness

Abundance

Centeredness

Unity with self or Creator

Patience

Humor

Forgiveness

Can also be used for crisis situations: panic attacks, pain, anxiety before surgery, transitions in life, processing painful emotions, dealing with stress and demands of life, depression, feeling empty inside, unloved as well as unwanted.

Excerpt from:

The Art and Technique of Using Flower Essences By Cynthia Scherer

Love Seized

Living lost days,
We sat in a crime,
Our eyes fixed by love.

Humbled by its quiet nature,
We danced forever
In that look.

When our hearts melted
Between the lyrical flow of our hands
And the thick weight of our breath,
Something gave way.

But it wasn’t as it seemed,
For it was a different love
Unseen.
A love
Seized,
Just before,
Healing.

Unveiling The Truth…to discovering your inner self.

Unveiling The Truth…to discovering your inner self.

Finally here, my truth!

Written by me, the idea came from not feeling I had the “ideal” body, as well as not feeling “white” enough, according to my society. And that led to feelings of unattractiveness and feelings of rejection.

During the finishing steps of the book over the last years, I realized it was healing alot of anger from the rejection I felt from my mother saw as well.

Useful tips and tools simplified for teenagers, but adults will appreciate the affirmations and quotes as well, and maybe even my perspective.

Very healing.

Interviews: Our Females and What They Have Learned From Our Media

-These are two interviews I conducted during the process of writing my book, during the year 2011.
– They were actually meant to be included, but it was agreed that they would be a better fit here.
РI wanted to get other opinions of other young women from different ethnicities and well as parts of the country to share their perspective on what they feel America considers an attractive woman.  Only two ethnicities are featured here.  I would love to add more to this list in the future, that also includes girls growing up in current times, to see if anything has changed.
Both were asked the same series of questions.
Female #1
Ethnicity: African American
Current Age At Time of Interview: 18
Born and raised: Sacramento, CA
Mother was in home

1) ¬†What is your idea of the “perfect” body type?

The perfect body type is one where a person is not limited in what they want to do

2) ¬†What do you think America’s idea of physical beauty is? (weight, ethnicity, status, hair color, etc)

White, blonde hair, blue eyes, and a size 0-2

Did you think you fit “that look?

No, I may be slim, but I am far from the look

3)  Do you think it is important to be beautiful in our society?

Yes, but it is more important for a person to view themself as beautiful

4) How did your mother portray beauty to you?

“Beauty is in the eye of the beholder” and “Beauty is only skin deep” she always portrayed beauty as being on the inside and it will show on the outside

Was she concerned with looking beautiful all the time?

No, I don’t ever remember her being worried about beauty

Were there pressures from her to be beautiful?

 No, she is more concerned with having a beautiful personality

 

5) Did you perceive yourself as beautiful?

Not when I was younger, but during my senior year in high school I did

Were you told often that you were beautiful?

By my mother yes

 

If yes, do you feel you have been valued/recognized for your talents/abilities as well as your beauty?

Yes, by my mother

If yes, did you feel pressured to be “pretty” all the time?

Not at all

 

How did this make you feel?

I was never bothered by it

6)  Did you grow up in an environment that was body conscious?

Not really, I grew up around boys so beauty was not very important

7) ¬†Were you body conscious or were you interested in “being pretty?”

I’m not sure of the difference

If this was an issue for you, please answer these below, if not you can skip to #8:

If so, did you wear makeup?

 

I didn’t start wearing makeup until I was 13 years old and I only wore eyeshadow and mascara

 

If so, did you feel you needed it all the time to “look” beautiful? ¬†Would you be comfortable leaving the house without any on?

 

No, I didn’t wear makeup that often when I was younger and I still don’t wear it that much

 

How did you feel entering high school around pretty girls in regards to dating or otherwise?

I didn’t think much about it. I was more concerned with trying to meet new people because I was new to the students because all my old friends went to a different school

Did you compare yourself to them?

Not often, I didn’t worry about the¬†other girls¬†at my school too much

8) Did you grow up with healthy male attention from your father or another male figure?

Yes, I grew up with my step dad for 9 years now

 

If so, did they tell you were beautiful and special?

 

No, but I don’t think I needed that when I was younger

 

9)   Do you think you valued your body or YOU as a teenager?

I valued myself as a teenager, even if I didn’t quite understand that I did value myself.

If you do value and love yourself COMPLETELY, and were not concerned with your looks and being pretty, what kind of advice do you have for other young girls that are concerned with them?

I think most girls don’t know that makeup is supposed to enhance your beauty and not BE your beauty; which means that girls are already beautiful without makeup naturally. I think that more young girls need to understand that beauty comes in many different shapes, forms, textures, and colors and that everything is beautiful in its own way.

 

10) Do you value yourself inwardly or outwardly now?

 

I value myself inwardly because I value my thoughts and feelings

If not, what do you wish you would have been taught that would have helped you be more confident in yourself in your early teenage years? (Do you wish your mother or father would have told you how special you were, how you had talents?  What would you have liked to have heard or seen?)

11) ¬†What do you wish American media would portray to young girls and women in terms of¬†what is considered “pretty”?

or do you think they should portray our accomplishments or something else instead?

 

I think that America should portray everyone as being beautiful in their own way. Some individual celebrities do try to show young girls this, but I think the overall media should make more of an effort to portray beauty as more than skin deep.

Female #2
Ethnicity: Caucasion
Born and raised: Illinois
Current Age at Time Interview: 34
Mother in home

1) ¬†What is your idea of the “perfect” body type?

 

My idea of the perfect body type is the type one can feel comfortable with by being themselves; physically I prefer an athletic body for myself but I don’t¬†necessarily¬†think everyone should have that type of body.¬†

 

2) ¬†What do you think America’s idea of physical beauty is? (weight, ethnicity, status, hair color, etc)

 

When I think of “America’s idea of beauty” I think it has changed over the years.. I think it used to be¬†Caucasian, blonde hair, blue eyes, 110lbs..but I think times have changed and on the magazines I still see thin but sometimes dangerously thin, all¬†ethnicity¬†but not really healthy looking¬†unfortunately.

 

Did you think you fit “that look?

I think I somewhat fit the older version of “All American” with a few extra pounds that I’m happy with.

 

3)  Do you think it is important to be beautiful in our society?

 

I would love to say no but unfortunately the reality is that it is important. It is instinctual to judge on appearances and our society (meaning our media) has fashioned us to believe it is extremely important.

 

4) How did your mother portray beauty to you?  

My mother portrayed beauty to me by saying I don’t have to prove myself to anyone and that inner confidence is what makes one beautiful.

 

Was she concerned with looking beautiful all the time?

 

No she was not concerned with looking beautiful all the time. ¬†She was only concerned¬†occasionally¬†for example a special occasion, or going out to dinner. She wasn’t the type to put on make up just to go to the grocery store.¬†

 

Were there pressures from her to be beautiful?

 

¬†Not at all.¬†Her motto is “comfort over fashion”. I learned most of what I know about fashion and beauty by reading fashion magazines.

 

5) Did you perceive yourself as beautiful? 

 

I felt like an ugly duckling growing up and sometimes wished my mother would have shown me more about how to be fashionable and how to be pretty.

  

Were you told often that you were beautiful?

 

Not often. Just when we were dressed up for occasions and not really at all from my dad. In fact I remember my mother and he had words once because she said he needed to tell me I looked beautiful and he responded by saying no i don’t because she will hear that enough from other people. She responded by saying, “..but she needs to hear it from you.”¬†

 

If yes, do you feel you have been valued/recognized for your talents/abilities as well as your beauty?

 

My parents always pushed me to do sports. Sometimes I didn’t want to it because it wasn’t always fun but now that I’m older I’m glad I did….so to answer this question I guess the recognition I received was mostly related to sports.

 

If yes, did you feel pressured to be “pretty” all the time?

 

No

 

How did this make you feel?

 

It made me feel like a tomboy and by the time the other girls in school were wearing makeup and starting to make themselves look nicer, I felt like I didn’t know what I was supposed to do.

 

6)  Did you grow up in an environment that was body conscious? 

 

No – only in a sense that we shouldn’t stuff ourselves when eating, and that we should eat and be healthy, drink lots of water, and posture and articulation were¬†extremely¬†important for some reason…Now that I’m older I understand why.

 

7) ¬†Were you body conscious or were you interested in “being pretty?”

 

Yes. I thought I boy might not like me if I weren’t pretty. Even though my mom told me that wasn’t true, I didn’t believe her back then.

 

 

If this was an issue for you, please answer these below, if not you can skip to #8:

 

If so, did you wear makeup?

Yes.

 

If so, did you feel you needed it all the time to “look” beautiful? ¬†Would you be comfortable leaving the house without any on?¬†

 

I wasn’t comfortable leaving the house without make up on until I became much older and finally someone made me feel beautiful without my makeup.

 

How did you feel entering high school around pretty girls in regards to dating or otherwise?  

 

I felt pretty but never really got along with many other girls. I also felt like more of a trend setter than a follower and I think other girls felt threatened by that. 

 

 

Did you compare yourself to them?  

 

Only by thinking I wish they felt as comfortable as I did being unique and would accept me for it, but most the time they didn’t but that didn’t stop me either. I tried to be friends with other girls but so many of them turned out to be whiney and shallow, and nobody likes that so I figured I would be better off being an independent woman and being choosy with the friends I select.¬†

 

8) Did you grow up with healthy male attention from your father or another male figure?

I would have to say no.

 

If so, did they tell you were beautiful and special?

No…see #5

 

9)   Do you think you valued your body or YOU as a teenager?

 

No. Looking back on it I think I did by being unique but if I would have had more attention from my dad I probably wouldn’t have had so so many boyfriends.

 

If you do value and love yourself COMPLETELY, and were not concerned with your looks and being pretty, what kind of advice do you have for other young girls that are concerned with them?

 

Even though I was concerned I still have advice for girls and that is: try not to be somebody else just because you think it’s popular. Most of the time the popular thing to do isn’t always the right thing to do…love yourself for being unique and someday someone will come along and love you for that.

 

..and those girls who are mean and popular?…They end up terribly miserable later in life…so don’t worry about them.

 

10) Do you value yourself inwardly or outwardly now?

 

Inwardly